Medical Benefits Now Available for Veterans Subjected to Chem-Bio Tests

Chemical Weapons Testing on U.S. Veterans
Test subjects enter a gas chamber, which will fill with mustard gas, as part of the military’s secret chemical warfare testing in March 1945. Credit: Edgewood Arsenal

Military Veterans may be eligible to receive medical care if they participated in U.S. Army chemical or biological substance testing from 1942 to 1975 and have an injury or disease that they believe was proximately caused by their participation.

About 6,000 of the soldiers that the U.S. Army tested potential chemical and biological substances on are still living and may be eligible for medical care.

A recent class action lawsuit filed by the Vietnam Veterans of America required the U.S. Army to provide medical care to veterans who volunteered to contribute to the advancement of the U.S. biological and chemical programs.

To apply, eligible veterans must have:

  • A Department of Defense Form 214 (DD 214) or War Department discharge/separation form or the functional equivalent.
  • Served as a volunteer medical research subject in a U.S. Army chemical or biological substance testing program from 1942 to 1975, including the receipt of medications or vaccines under the U.S. Army investigational drug review.
  • A diagnosed medical condition they believe to be a direct result of their participation in a U.S. Army chemical or biological substance testing program.

Medical care, to include medications, will be provided at the closest military medical treatment facility that has the capability and capacity. Medical care is supplemental to the comprehensive medical care a plaintiff is entitled to receive through the VA based on their status as a veteran.

Eligible veterans are encouraged to go to http://armymedicine.mil/Pages/cbtp.aspx or call 1-800-984-8523 if they have any questions or need assistance.

See also:

Sources: Army.mil, VA.gov

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